Category Archives: Book News

The latest buzz in children’s literature.

A Curious Tale: Interview with Longy Han

imageLongy Han loves a bit of adventure and travel, and with her natural curiosity and imagination, she aptly developed her new book series, ‘The Curious Travels of Gusto & Gecko’. Longy’s personal journey resulted in this wondrous quest between a pair of time-travelling dinosaurs, taking on the world one city at a time. The first book, bravely crowdfunded and self-published by Longy, is ‘Gusto and Gecko Travel to Kenya’.

Crafted by Elinor Hägg, the adorable, cartoonised illustrations with their bold and vibrant earth-tones sweep the pages, immediately hooking its readers in for the wild ride ahead. A naive prehistoric dinosaur pair jet off in their Rombom travel machine and enter an unknown land. Experiencing a real sense of urgency, the story takes off when a ferocious lion charges at their heels, and they dart through the plains of the serengeti. In each scene, upon encountering other African wildlife in their natural habitats, Gusto and Gecko attempt trickery to escape the jaws of the attacking lion. But no dust, hiding places, or blending in with the wildebeest crowd fool the roaring beast, until a fortuitous camouflage disguise saves their tails. A jolly celebration and a beautiful sunset conclude their extraordinary escapade on this present Sunday afternoon.

imageConnecting with themes including teamwork and courage, ‘Gusto and Gecko’ primarily aims to broaden the minds and awareness of its young readers to our fascinating world and cultures within it. This book is humorous and suspenseful with a plethora of details to explore, including the two concealed dinosaurs and their little mice companions. Flipping the ordinary and logic on its head, Longy Han has produced a wonderfully imaginative story that will have its early primary readers longing to take this tumultuous expedition again and again.

Han Creative, September 2015.

I spoke with Longy about how her ideas hatched and the plans set on her future horizon.

Congratulations on the release of your first picture book, Gusto & Gecko Travel to Kenya! Can you briefly explain your publishing process?

Gusto & Gecko was made possible through crowdfunding with the help of family, friends and the wider community. Elinor, my rockstar illustrator, was discovered through an online Facebook illustration competition that I ran.   From the get go, I wanted to challenge the traditional publishing process, bend rules and engage with the end consumers. I ran an interactive campaign so I could involve the public from the beginning to the end -people got to vote on the illustration designs which directly impacted on the creative process as well as the outcome of the book. This way, the book is not just mine – it’s all of ours.

‘Gusto and Gecko’ is a fun and lively story of discovery, friendship and shenanigans in the African wilderness. Who or what inspired you to write this story? What do you hope readers will gain from reading it?

I lived in remote Kenya for a month at an orphanage teaching kids mathematics and English (at least I tried)! At the end of my trip, I felt humbled and lucky to walk away with a really valuable life lesson: it doesn’t take much to be happy and kind to others. The animals I saw on my safari trip were also majestic. So I wanted to share my travel experiences and encourage readers to explore the world!

The illustrations by Elinor Hägg are gorgeously animated and humorous. How did the collaboration come about and what was it like to work with her?

Elinor is a graphic designer based in Sweden. I have never met her in my life but I feel incredibly lucky to join forces with her. During the brainstorming and sketching phase, we would Skype on a weekly basis and email several times a day. We brainstormed on our own first and then shared our ideas. Sometimes I come up with the most crazy ideas and Elli would have to put up with me. Overall, it went so well that she has agreed to work on the second book with me (surely that is a good sign)?!

imageWhat was your favourite part of the story to create?

The second page of the book is my favourite page – I love imagining what the travel machine (the Rombom) looks like, how it moves through space and the sounds it makes. The dotted lines actually signify the movements of the Rombom so I hope the little ones will trace those lines as they read the book.

If you could be any African animal which one would you choose? Why?

A giant hippo! How awesome would it be to lie or roll around in wet mud all day? I’m also pretty clumsy so being a hippo means no one can tell if I accidently slipped in the mud or if it were a planned maneuver!

What do you love most about Kenya?

Joie de vivre in the Kenyan people, especially the kids.

What do you love most about writing for children?

Every time I pen a story, I feel liberated – like a kid again where curiosity knows no bounds, imagination runs free and absurdity is accepted, treasured and enjoyed.

imageYou are currently planning another crowdfunding campaign for your second book, Gusto & Gecko Travel to New Orleans. What can you reveal about this next title in the series?

The next book will be set in New Orleans. This year is the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and I want to, through storytelling, celebrate what a beautiful and truly fascinating city New Orleans is. After all, it is the birthplace of jazz, home to authentic Cajun and Creole cooking and breeding ground for dangerous alligators!

Gusto & Gecko’s first stop is none other than the quintessential Café du Monde, best known for its signature beignets. As Gusto devours the hot, crispy, sugar-dusted beignet, nothing will prepare them for what happens next! Will you travel with us?

What else can we look forward to from Longy Han and her adorable friends, Gusto and Gecko?

A lot more absurd and fun-filled stories about countries around the world!

Thanks so much for talking with me, Longy! 🙂

Longzhen Han also has a vision to invest in the future of our next generation by giving back to the community. She is running a ‘BOOK FOR BOOK’ promise where every purchase made via the current crowdfunding campaign will include a donated copy to a child in need. Please head to the Gusto and Gecko campaign to make a pledge. You can also find more information about Longy and her book series at her website and facebook pages.  

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Filed under Author Interviews, Book News, Book Reviews, Romi Sharp

The Journey Begins

Following several rides on The Giant Drop, I took a rather giddy step back. It felt as though the manuscripts I’d submitted were starting to turn on me. ‘Oh, you think we’re so good. You think you’ll be turning publishers away with all the attention we’ll bring. You think your books will be up in literary lights… think again! We’re nothing, but wish-wash! You’ll never have your name on a book if we’re all you have to offer!’

Ah, the old seed of self-doubt, angrily sprouting away. Wondrous, isn’t it?!

I needed to view the bigger picture. As difficult as it was, I decided to put those pesky manuscripts aside and start something fresh. My morale yearned for it. In early 2014, I created a character; a curious, young boy on a quest to problem-solve, using his active imagination. I had hopes of turning his adventures into a picture book series. I drafted the first story and within a few months of daily rewrites and edits, he was ready. I knew it this time. This little guy was not going turn on me!

I submitted my manuscript to Kids’ Book Review for assessment and was delighted with the feedback. My idea was unique, entertaining and picture-book-appropriate. The one thing letting it down was that I had written the story in rhyme and the meter was inconsistent in most parts. The irony of a musician failing to write rhythmically, but I later realised my struggle may be because there’s no musical accompaniment in a book! No instrumentation to fill gaps and complete phrases.

Although there were many positives to my creation, the manuscript still needed work.

A highly experienced and professional author and editor, from the KBR team, saw promise in the story idea and my approach to improving it, and offered her services to work with me. How grateful I was, to have her knowledge and expertise helping my story (and me as a writer)! I’m thankful every day, for this experience.

Seeing my story take much better shape, I decided there were to be no ‘giant drops’ with this one. I knew it shone and my editor agreed. I showed the complete manuscript to fellow creatives and they also agreed. All signs were pointing the same way, urging me to transform this story to book. Following thorough research, I decided to self-publish. A 100% guarantee that my work would see the light of day and 100% creative control over its publication. I like having control. Some say, I need it. I’m relieved and thankful that I followed those signs because it was the beginning of a long and wonderfully rewarding (and challenging!) journey.

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Catch you next month for the next leg. 🙂

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Filed under Author Business, Book News, Publishing Tips, Renee Price

Working with an Awesome Publisher

Guest Post By Dianne (Di) Bates

Dianne (Di) Bates, award-winning author of over 120 books for children, recipient of The Lady Cutler Award 2008, and founder of the popular Buzz Words e-zine, reflects on her most recent publishing experience with Big Sky Publishing.

imageWorking with Australian publisher Big Sky Publishing to produce my two latest books, Awesome Cats and Awesome Dogs has been, in a word, awesome! I emailed my manuscripts in late January this year, receipt was acknowledged the next day, and them less than three weeks later I received an email from the publisher Diane Evans saying the company was interested. Submitting a manuscript and having it contracted in less than two months is something I hadn’t experienced in many years. This was the beginning of what has turned out to be a very happy journey for me.

The publisher was a total delight to work with; I was constantly told what was happening and my opinion sought and when I was sent samples of the artwork to approve, I was even happier. Each of the books feature lots of gorgeous illustrations combined with coloured photographic images of adorable dogs and cats from Best Friends Rescue and Little Legs Cat Rescue. The inclusion of real-life images and stories of the charismatic animals from these pet rescue organisations adds another level of education and inspiration. The books also feature quirky cartoon characters; the information is attractively presented with lots of break-out boxes – the whole of the books are all wonderfully designed.

Big Sky Publishing also promotes their titles via schools through Redgum Book Club, focusing on quality children’s books for children aged 4 to 13 years of age. Diane Evan’s sister, Sharon, who is responsible for book promotion, has also been a blessing in the publishing process. On top of that, Jodie Bennett, who also works with the Evans’ sisters, has been responsible for the production and delivery of bookmarks and posters – all in full, bright colour, and like the illustrations in each of the books, beautifully designed and presented.

imageI could not have imagined that the Awesome Cats, Dogs and Horses’ books would turn out as brilliantly as they have. My whole experience with Big Sky Publishing from start to finish has been an author’s dream… in fact I really couldn’t have dreamed it, only hoped for it. What is also exciting is that the company will publish two more awesome books in mid 2016: Awesome Horses and Awesome Kids. I’m sure they will be just as awesome as the two coming out on 1 October this year.
Each paperback book has about 150 pages and retails for $14.99. The books will also be available as e-books ($6.99) and distribution to bookshops is through Woodslane, phone: (02) 8445 2300 F: (02) 9970 5002, info@woodslane.com.au, www.woodslane.com.au.

People can also buy the books at the following links:
Awesome Cats … and Awesome Dogs.
Details about Dianne (Di) Bates
Website: http://www.enterprisingwords.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dianne.bates.71
Twitter: @dibatesauthor
Blog: Writing for Children http://diannedibates.blogspot.com.au/

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CBCA Statistics

Book Week is amongst us and there are schools around Australia enthralled with the Children’s Book Council of Australia awards books.

Last Friday while we were  congratulating the winners, some Australian authors, illustrators and publishers were planning their book for the next year’s awards.

After attending Jane Parsons’ presentation and writing the article, ‘Judging the Judges’ I was left with some fascinating statistics which I thought I would share.

The Books

CBCA                  Entries for 2015

Early Childhood             59

Picture Books             122

Younger Readers       128

Older Readers             77

Eve Pownall                  48

Not eligible                       2

Total entries                   434

Or if you prefer a pie chart

cbca 1

The Publishers

Publishers, authors and illustrators to enter the CBCA awards need to pay an  entry fee of $100 plus copies of the book for each of the judges. It has been good to see an increase in self-published books. Although I am not a self-published author, I love the idea that a self-published author or illustrator could be ‘found’ during the CBCA awards and sky-rocket their writing career during the CBCA awards process.

Allen & Unwin 15%

Five Mile Press 2%

Fremantle Press 2%

Hachette/Lothian 2%

Harper Collins/ A&R/ABC 5%

Little Hare/Hardie Grant Egmont 3%

National Institutions 1%

New Frontier 3%

Other Publishers 10%

Pan Macmillan 2%

Penguin Books Australia 14%

Random House Australia 11%

Scholastic/Omnibus/ Scholastic Press 7%

Self Published 14%

UQP 3%

Walker Books Australia/ Black Dog 9%

Figures are approximate

The four largest publishers, Allen & Unwin, Penguin Books Australia, Walker Books Australia and Random House Australia submitted nearly half (44.06%) of all entries.

Themes

I will leave it up to you, the reader, the writer, the book enthusiasts to analyse the main themes in each of the categories.

Older Readers – book themes

cbca older readers

Younger Readers – book themes

cbca younger readers

Early Childhood – book themes

CBCA early childhood

Picture Books – book themes

cbca picture book

The Children’s Book Council of Australia awards could not continue without the final two groups which I have to mention.

The Judges  

cbca judgesFiction Judges

Michele Huet (ACT)                     Suzanne Thomson (NT)

Cathie Tasker (NSW)                   Kevin Steinberger (QLD)

John Forster (SA)                           Tricia Scott (Tas)

Jane Parsons (Vic)                        Anne-Marie Strother (WA)

Eve Pownall Award Judges

Helen Adam (WA)                        Felicia Harris (WA)

Chloe Mauger (WA)

Awards Co-ordinators – Patricia Montgomery (WA) and Sue Wyche (WA)

Awards Chairs – Angela Briant (Tas) and Margo Hillel (Vic)

The Sponsors

Seventy years ago when CBCA awards began, the winners received a handshake for males and a camellia for females. Government funding supported the awards from 1966-1988. This changed to commercial sponsorship. At the end of 1995 CBCA set up an Awards Foundation in the aim of collecting $1 000 000 to support the Awards prizes.

Awards Foundation Benefactors

Scholastic Australia Pty Ltd            Allen &   Unwin Pty Ltd       Laurie Copping OAM (In memoriam)     Thyne Reid Trust No. 1

Major Donors

Australia Post       Jill Bruce     Sandy Campbell      Era Publications     Five Mile Press       Libby Gleeson AM

Bob Graham      Hachette Children’s Books Australia      Hardie Grant Egmont Pty Ltd     Harper Collins Publishers Aus

Ipswich District Teacher-Librarians’ Network       The James N Kirby Foundation      Kinross-Wolaroi School

Koala Books      Library Board of QLD    Angela Naomi      The Northern Territory Government      Parents and Boys at Sydney Grammar School, Edgecliff Prep        Penguin Books Australia      Random House Australia Pty Ltd        Emily Rodda (Jennifer Rowe)       Gillian Rubinstein       Maurice Saxby AM     SA Dpt of the Arts and Cultural Development    Cathie Tasker

University of QLD Press      Julie Vivas     Walker Books Australia Pty Ltd       Margaret Wild       Sue Williams

And the following in memoriam – Jean Chapman, Max Fatchen, Beryl Moncrieff Matthews, Jill Midolo,  Jan Ormerod, Eve Pownall, Marion E Robertson, Cassandra Weddell and Miss Maisie Williams, Garah.

Thanks to the Judges, the sponsors, the publishers, the authors, the illustrators and of course us readers who enjoy books in all shapes and sizes.

Feel free to share your thoughts on this year’s CBCA winners.

Thank you to Jane Parsons for allowing me to use your presentation statistics in my post, all other information directly from CBCA website.

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More Books to Light Up Our World

Our literary professionals are awe-inspiring. Their ability to write, illustrate and market these books to foster a love of reading and learning throughout the nation, and the world, is remarkable. The potential they have in capturing young people’s hearts and minds is nothing short of extraordinary. Having some of these wonderful books celebrated and acknowledged in the Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Awards is certainly a positive sign of their credibility.

Following on from my previous ‘Books Light Up Our World’ reviews and activities list, here are a few more to discover to help celebrate a love for reading.

 

Shortlisted Picture Book of the Year.

Shortlisted Picture Book of the Year.

Fire, Jackie French (author), Bruce Whatley (illus.), Scholastic Press, 2014.

Review – Literally lighting a world before our eyes, burning through our hearts is the highly evocative and devastating story of loss, courage and regrowth following a natural disaster. With French’s mesmerising poetry that simply takes your breath away, paired with Whatley’s grippingly haunting, bleeding and volcanic spreads, ‘Fire‘ engulfes the land, and our emotions. From pain comes strength, and we are uplifted by the human spirit, the power of love and the rebirth of a new dawn.

imageEducational ActivityLanguage.

Acrostic Poem. Use the word BUSHFIRE (or your choice) to write a poem (acrostic or other), utilising symbolic language representing the events in the story.

For more Fire teaching notes please click here.

 

Shortlisted Picture Book of the Year.

Shortlisted Picture Book of the Year.

The Duck and the Darklings, Glenda Millard (author), Stephen Michael King, (illus.), Allen & Unwin, 2014.

Review – This book is sure to strike up a spark in your heart. From total desolation comes a story of hope and triumph, with an exposion of warmth. Living in the land of Dark, Peterboy brings the dazzle and glimmer to his Grandpapa’s eyes with a treasured scrap of wonderfulness; a downy-hearted duck called Idaduck. As Grandpapa restores Idaduck’s health, his glow of forbidden fondness (happy memories) is also restored, and in consequence, their world becomes strangely bright once more. Captivating, poetic text and striking, bold illustrations make ‘The Duck and the Darklings’ an award-winning book of depth, wonder, radiance and immense significance.

imageEducational ActivityLanguage, Science.

Light up a room with your very own homemade candle. Materials include wax flakes, pre-waxed candle wicks, container for candle, crayons, essential oils (optional). For instructions please click on She Knows.

For more The Duck and the Darklings teaching notes please click here.

 

Shortlisted Early Childhood Book of the Year.

Shortlisted Early Childhood Book of the Year.

Pig the Pug, Aaron Blabey (author, illus.), Scholastic, 2014.

Review – Well, what can we say about this little pug? I’m sure you all know the story well… A greedy, selfish, bulgy-eyed, maniacal dog who refuses to share nothing but insults with his flatmate sausage dog, Trevor. How does this book coincide with the theme of ‘Books Light Up Our World’? Let’s see. Pig steals all the limelight. He has a flash of craziness in his eyes. The highlight of the story is his utter misfortune, involving a bright, sunlit window and the reference to the phrase ‘when pigs can fly’. And the fact that through the darkness of Pig’s heart there is a little glimmer of hope that he has learnt a lesson… Aaron Blabey’s hysterical rhyming text and eminently vivacious illustrations definitely fire up its readers with the inexplicable placing of a soft spot for our furry friend (or foe).

 

imageEducational ActivityLanguage, Science, Art

Help Pig the Pug to fly! Design and construct a straw rocket that can propel Pig through the air. Draw and cut out a picture of Pig the Pug. Roll up a strip of paper to fit long-ways, stick it at the back of the picture and fit over a straw, sticking down the top end. Blow through the straw and watch Pig fly!

For more Pig the Pug teaching notes please click here.

 

Shortlisted Early Childhood Book of the Year.

Shortlisted Early Childhood Book of the Year.

A House of Her Own, Jenny Hughes (author), Jonathan Bentley (illus.), Little Hare Books, 2014.

Review – Audrey requests the most extraordinary favour of her happy-go-lucky father, which if anyone received would certainly light up their world. When Audrey proclaims that she is too small for her current abode, a house high up in the backyard tree sounds perfect! Her handy dad fulfills all her wishes, from the marvellous spiral staircase, an over-hanging snorkelling tub, a spot for sipping tea and a comfy blue bed. It’s spectacular, but all that independence and responsibility is perhaps more than Audrey can handle. Was building Audrey’s heavenly, light-filled tree house the most brilliant idea afterall? Endearing dialogue between Audrey and her accommodating dad, and breathtaking, vibrant illustrations make ‘A House of Her Own’ an energetic and sunny book of love, dedication and achieving magnificent heights.

image image imageEducational ActivityLanguage, Science, Technology.

Design and construct your own magnificent tree house filled with light using a box, paper rolls, textas, egg cartons, pipe cleaners, other craft materials. Use a torch and/or mirror to glow or reflect light. Discuss your own needs and create places to bathe, cook, sleep, entertain, and of course, a spiral staircase! Write labels on a diagram and/or a sentence explaining how this house of your own is your ideal dwelling.

 

Have you created or seen fantastic book ideas for a book that you love?

Look out for the announcement of the 2015 Winning Books of the Year from the CBCA tomorrow!

Which book are you tipping for a win?

 

 

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Books Light Up Our World – Picture Book Reviews and Activities

Book Week is hosted annually by the Children’s Book Council of Australia and this year marks the 70th anniversary celebration in honour of the inspirational work of Australian authors and illustrators. By promoting books we, as parents, educators, writers, children’s literacy advocates, are encouraging children to read and inherit a love of books, and a love of learning.

In 2015, Book Week will run from August 22nd – 28th with the brilliant theme of ‘Books Light Up Our World’. Over two posts I will provide descriptions of picture books I love and related educational activities, including some of the shortlisted titles in the running to win in the CBCA’s Book of the Year Awards, plus a few extra goodies you might like to explore. Enjoy!

 

Scary Night is shortlisted in the Early Childhood category.

Scary Night is shortlisted in the Early Childhood category.

Scary Night, Lesley Gibbes (author), Stephen Michael King (illus.), Working Title Press, 2014.

Review – This book can’t light up your world more with its complete darkness, under the pale moonlight! An utterly spooky yet courageous story of Pig with a parcel, Hare with a Hat and Cat with a cake traipsing through perilous forests, crocodile-infested waters, cemetaries and bat caves to a most mysterious destination. Gloriously animated illustrations and rollicking, rhythmic text have already sparked the curiosity and delight of many young (and old) readers across the country.

imageEducational Activity –  Language, Arts.

Draw and cut out character pictures or silhouettes and attach to sticks to create your own stick or shadow puppets. Retell or recreate the story for dramatic play. Create a mural background for stick puppets, or shine a torch as you action your shadow puppets against the wall.

For more Scary Night teaching notes please click here.

 

Go To Sleep, Jessie! is shortlisted in the Early Childhood category.

Go To Sleep, Jessie! is shortlisted in the Early Childhood category.

Go To Sleep, Jessie!, Libby Gleeson (author), Freya Blackwood (illus.), Little Hare, 2015.

ReviewGo To Sleep, Jessie! will light a fire in your heart. It’s such a sweet and gentle story of a little girl feeling the angst as her baby sister has trouble settling down to sleep. Gleeson skillfully masters the raw emotions of these girls (and their parents) in this all-too-familiar situation. Equally so, Blackwood’s illustrations capture this light and shade perfectly both viscerally and literally in her colour palette. A completely warming and enlightening story of sisterly love.

imageEducational ActivityLanguage, Arts.

Design and make a dreamcatcher to soothe baby to sleep. The patterns in your design also create pretty patterns when the light shines through! Sing lullabies to help calm your little brother or sister for bedtime.

Find instructions from Laughing Kids Learn here.

 

imageSummer Rain, Ros Moriarty (author), Balarinji (illus.), Allen and Unwin, 2015.

Review – This book lights up a beautiful serenade of native Australian animals across the stunning landscapes of the Northern Territory. From the dry morning sun the land awakes to bounding kangaroos, turtles and lizards, and when the summer rain splatters on the dusty earth, flowers burst and leaves dance, brolgas strut and dugongs dive. The vivid and striking Indigenous illustrations and poetic language certainly emanate joy and energy to light a glimmer in any readers’ eyes.

imageEducational ActivityLanguage, Art, Nature.

Create a poster / mural divided into Dry Season and Wet Season with painted scenes and animals in bright colours. Write descriptive sentences about the scenes using verbs and adjectives. For example, “…the sun beats with steamy heat.” “Wattles burst in fuzzy gold.” Discuss the differences between Dry and Wet seasons. How would each feel / affect the animals?

 

imageDigby’s Moon Mission, Renee Price (author), Anil Tortop (illus.), Create It Kids, 2014.

Review – A young, curious boy sets out on an adventurous mission to illuminate a moon that appears only a sliver of its former self. With a team of gourmet chefs (his friends), a glorious catapult contraption and a trusty measuring tape, Digby plumps up the moon in the most creative, and comical, way. The wonderfully whimsical and energetic illustrations beautifully compliment this ingenious story with all its teachable moments and themes referencing time, measurement, moon phases, rhyming words, friendship and working together. An absolute delight for preschoolers that will, just like the real moon, light up their world.

imageEducational ActivityLanguage, Science, Art.

Create eight (or four) phases of the moon by cutting out the shapes separately on black cards. Phases include new moon, waxing crescent, first quarter, waxing gibbous, full, waning gibbous, third quarter/half, waning crescent. Hang up the moon phases on a window or around a lamp to see them glow. Discuss and label the different phases and their shapes. Monitor the moon each night and record it in a diary.

More reviews and lessons here

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Read about Jenny Graham’s experience at a presentation by CBCA judges on these prestigious awards here.

 

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CBCA Judging the Judges.

 

I attended a presentation at my local library by Children’s Book Council of Australia judge, Jane Parsons.

I went with the intention of writing about the presentation. I had pen and notepad ready, however what I didn’t have was a focus. I could write about the shortlisted books, the process, the awards, the statistics, the themes, the illustrations, the list could go on.

Within minutes I was mesmerised by Jane’s descriptive language for each of the shortlisted books and the notables. I could hear the passion in her voice for not only books but her want for others to be enlightened by books.

Her language was so powerful that if she had reviewed, a Dog Grooming book I would have run out and bought it…..even though I don’t own a dog. Thanks to Jane I have many, many more books on my to-read pile.

I loved her idea that the notables should be released first to give them a ‘chance to shine’.

But who was this Jane Parsons and the other seven judges?

Why should authors, illustrators or publishers pay the $100 entry fee and provide copies of their book for the judging panel?

Why should Australian readers trust their judgement?

This is what interested me. I had listened to the introduction about Jane however was side-tracked with our mutual experience of working in a remote Indigenous community.

I sought answers, and I wasn’t surprised when I read the profiles in Reading Time (http://readingtime.com.au/judges-views/) of the seven other judges and their passion in books, which shined through.

Between the eight judges they had the following past and present experience: Teacher Librarian, Editor, Publisher, Eve Pownell Judge, Community Librarian, Deputy Principal, Artist, Writer, Reviewer, University Studies in Literacy, Children’s Literature and Librarianship, English Teacher, ESL Teacher, Education Officer, Book of the Year Judge, Book Seller, Aurelia’s Awards Judge and Creative Writing Teacher.

Noting the experience of the judging panel I was surprised that there weren’t more emerging writers or published authors in the audience. From my observations most were Primary School Teachers, although they too could have an interest in writing professionally.

Jane Parsons and the other members of the judging panel had read and written a report on 400 books and  read each judging panel member’s report.

After writing 400 reports and reading 2800 reports they attended a Judge’s Conference. There they discussed in length the top 30 books in each category and chose notables, short listed and winners.

Imagine as an emerging writer being able to tap into this knowledge. Hear what makes a notable book and see where the enthusiasm for each book lies.

Whether you are a teacher, parent, an emerging writer, illustrator or author,

if you could ask a CBCA judge a question, what would you ask them?

I look forward to hearing the winners announced on August 21st and wish all shortlisted authors, illustrators and publishers the best of luck.

My boys loved reading all the Early Childhood shortlisted books, we wonder who will win.

pig 1

scary night

There are more posts planned for Book Week and the CBCA winner, so please follow to keep updated.

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